Upcoming Exhibition

parting and together - a group exhibition curated by trudy benson

Greenpoint Hill is thrilled to announce this incredible group show curated by Trudy Benson. The exhibition title comes from a painting by Elizabeth Murray, which was notable in that it pushed the boundaries of traditional rectangular paintings and foreshadowed the 3 dimensional shaped canvases she would go on to make. The exhibition includes works by:  Andrea Belag Maria Calandra Isabel Halley Leah James Caroline Larsen Rachel Malin Beth Noe Tessa Perutz Talia Shulze Adrienne Tarver Rachel Williams   Ranging from hand-painted digital prints by Talia Shulze, to ceramic vessels by Isabel Halley, to shaped canvas paintings by Rachel Williams, the tie that binds the work in this exhibition together is an obvious presence of the artist's hand. The works share an emphasis on materiality. Just as Elizabeth Murray's painting, an oil painting on a rectangle, was pushed to 3-d objecthood by rotating the canvas about 45 degrees, the work in this exhibition does not simply exist as 2-dimensional image.  In Maria Caladra's work, this shift occurs more subtly, through the mark-making. The work in Parting and Together asks for a more intimate viewing experience.

Greenpoint Hill is thrilled to announce this incredible group show curated by Trudy Benson. The exhibition title comes from a painting by Elizabeth Murray, which was notable in that it pushed the boundaries of traditional rectangular paintings and foreshadowed the 3 dimensional shaped canvases she would go on to make. The exhibition includes works by: 

Andrea Belag

Maria Calandra

Isabel Halley

Leah James

Caroline Larsen

Rachel Malin

Beth Noe

Tessa Perutz

Talia Shulze

Adrienne Tarver

Rachel Williams  

Ranging from hand-painted digital prints by Talia Shulze, to ceramic vessels by Isabel Halley, to shaped canvas paintings by Rachel Williams, the tie that binds the work in this exhibition together is an obvious presence of the artist's hand. The works share an emphasis on materiality. Just as Elizabeth Murray's painting, an oil painting on a rectangle, was pushed to 3-d objecthood by rotating the canvas about 45 degrees, the work in this exhibition does not simply exist as 2-dimensional image.  In Maria Caladra's work, this shift occurs more subtly, through the mark-making. The work in Parting and Together asks for a more intimate viewing experience.

 

Past Exhibitions

leah james - mineral vocabulary

Bringing together prehistoric technology and contemporary ceramics, for the past year and a half, Leah James has been choreographing controlled outdoor pit fires to create her new work.  The firing and the preparation of the kiln are a performance, documented by the resulting 5.75 x 8.75 inch finished clay slab “paintings.” Each piece is made unique during the firing. As chemicals oxidize and are absorbed on the surface, a range of colors and shapes are deposited upon the hand burnished stoneware from different combustibles; banana peels cause grey and blue marks, fine black lines are created by burnt hair, and sawdust causes planar and irregular black shapes. This process has affinities to exposure in photography but instead of light, exposure to heat and chemical oxides create a range of marks, colors, shapes, and cracks on the bare clay surface. The slabs become objects for looking and seeing, recollecting the process of the performance and our relationship to the Earth’s materiality. The work in Mineral Vocabulary was fired in April 2017 near Fishkill, New York. The document of the performance, nine rectangular ceramic paintings, hang side by side. This series plays on the nature of time and links the material of fired clay conceptually, as it is one of the formative human technologies. Clay is used abundantly in contemporary society but again relates to prehistory as the materials that make up the clay body have theoretically existed from the beginning of the universe and time itself, condensed within the solar nebulae. Leah James is a Canadian artist living and working in New York. She received her BA from University of Waterloo (2006) and has exhibited her work internationally. She co-organizes Side Effects Gallery, an artist run project space in Brooklyn. The work in this exhibition is the fifth piece in an ongoing series of pit firing performances. Leah will be conducting firings throughout the summer in Ontario, upstate and on beaches near New York City.

Bringing together prehistoric technology and contemporary ceramics, for the past year and a half, Leah James has been choreographing controlled outdoor pit fires to create her new work. 

The firing and the preparation of the kiln are a performance, documented by the resulting 5.75 x 8.75 inch finished clay slab “paintings.” Each piece is made unique during the firing. As chemicals oxidize and are absorbed on the surface, a range of colors and shapes are deposited upon the hand burnished stoneware from different combustibles; banana peels cause grey and blue marks, fine black lines are created by burnt hair, and sawdust causes planar and irregular black shapes. This process has affinities to exposure in photography but instead of light, exposure to heat and chemical oxides create a range of marks, colors, shapes, and cracks on the bare clay surface. The slabs become objects for looking and seeing, recollecting the process of the performance and our relationship to the Earth’s materiality.

The work in Mineral Vocabulary was fired in April 2017 near Fishkill, New York. The document of the performance, nine rectangular ceramic paintings, hang side by side. This series plays on the nature of time and links the material of fired clay conceptually, as it is one of the formative human technologies. Clay is used abundantly in contemporary society but again relates to prehistory as the materials that make up the clay body have theoretically existed from the beginning of the universe and time itself, condensed within the solar nebulae.

Leah James is a Canadian artist living and working in New York. She received her BA from University of Waterloo (2006) and has exhibited her work internationally. She co-organizes Side Effects Gallery, an artist run project space in Brooklyn. The work in this exhibition is the fifth piece in an ongoing series of pit firing performances. Leah will be conducting firings throughout the summer in Ontario, upstate and on beaches near New York City.

 

ALISON OWEN - FRAGMENT

Greenpoint Hill is pleased to present an exhibition of new work by Alison Owen on view from March 30 through May 14, with an opening reception on Thursday, March 30th 7-9pm.

Owen’s new work is assembled from scraps and residue found at the studio; often donated by artists who work alongside her. The work reflects the poetry found in fragments and cast-offs, existing as a quiet, formal response to the found materials.

The exhibition will also feature an installation made from the to-do lists and notes of her friends. Created from pages sent from the notes app, she has created physical versions of this digital ephemera. With some distance, divorced from context, these notes become little poems; dream-fragments.

isaac arvold - later

Arvold's exhibition of works on paper was inspired by escape. In 2016 he embarked on several adventures; including a journey to Central America where the jungle and ocean were in constant motion. This new body of work serves as a meditation on these infinite waves rolling in –  lines mimicking their repetition.

Isaac Arvold was born in 1979 in rural Minnesota, found his way to New York City in 2010, and currently resides in Brooklyn.

Libby VanderPloeg - Ladies Who Lead 

Our inaugural exhibition, "Ladies Who Lead" featured new work on paper by local Greenpoint artist, Libby VanderPloeg.

VanderPloeg's work spans painting, paper craft, mapmaking, and animation.

 

October 20, 2016 through January 20, 2017